Friday, October 27, 2017

London next week, week after Paris...

Harvey Benge - London, May 2017

I'm going to be in London next week and the week after in Paris for Paris Photo. If any of my photo friends feel like a beer, glass of wine (or 2) or a coffee, get in touch.

Harvey Benge - Paris, May 2017

Thursday, October 26, 2017

PARIS PHOTO - book signings

Book signing - Thursday Nov 9, 6pm

Paris Photo opens in the Grand Palais in just under 2 weeks... from Thursday November 9 through until Sunday November 12 there are book signings by all your, all my, favorite photographers.
Here, in no particular order, are just a few that are on my shortlist: Joel Meyerowitz, Guy Tillim, Rinko Kawauchi, Antoine d’Agata, David Lynch, Jim Goldberg, Sophie Calle, John Gossage, Koji Onaka, Susan Meiselas, Todd Hido, Roger Ballen, JH Engström. So many books, so little time!

And last but not least. I'll be signing my latest book - THE LAMENT - at Dewi Lewis stand on Thursday the 9th at 6pm... if you're around come and say hello!

You can check out the full list of signing on the Paris Photo website HERE.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Photography in Paris in November, the BJP reports

Lars Tunbjörk - Stock Brokerage, New York, 1997

Simon Bainbridge interviews Paris Photo directors Florence Bourgeois and Christoph Wiesner in the latest on-line offering from the British Journal of Photography. The article gives an in-depth look at the 21st edition of the world's premier photography fair which returns to Paris 9-12 November.
But there is more... The second edition of the Biennial of Photographers of the Contemporary Arab World at M.E.P. and seven other venues across the city. Noémie Goudal’s latest series, Telluris, created last spring in the Californian desert, complete with an on-site installation at Galerie Les Filles du Calvaire. Raymond Depardon’s Traverser retrospective at the Fondation Cartier-Bresson, Albert Renger Patzsch at the Jeu de Paume, Malick Sidibé’s Mali Twist at Fondation Cartier…

You can read the full story HERE

Monday, October 23, 2017

Why Artists' Books Are as Relevant as Ever...

NY Art Book Fair. Image via

In a post by on today's Artspace editor-in-chief Loney Adams talks with Printed Matter's Philip Aarons on Why Artist's Books are as relevant as ever in today's digital world. The piece is a must read for anybody who has ever made a bookwork or is contemplating doing so.

In the introduction to Artists Who Make Books, a brand-new release by Phaidon, co-editor Claire Lehmann writes, “At a time when an artist can utilize a wide miscellany of ways and means—a paintbrush, a custom software program, a camera, a CNC router, a found object—it seems worth asking: What does the artist’s book allow, in structure, expression, or reach?” Though artists have been making books for ages, it seems that with the ubiquity of digital media in 2017, artists have a range of democratic means of not only expressing themselves, but disseminating their work to a broad and diverse audience, diminishing the need for artists books and zines. And yet, artists who have developed their careers in a variety of mediums continue to turn to the book as a medium of many—a vehicle for ideas and expressions outside the confines of the white cube and the politics of the art market.

Joining Lehmann in editing Artists Who Make Books, along with Andrew Ross, is Philip Aarons, a die-hard collector of artists’ books who for years has served as the board chair of Printed Matter (a store-front operation started in the '70s by Sol LeWitt and Lucy Lippard as a headquarters of sorts for all things printed), and is a member of the Museum of Modern Art’s Library and Archive Trustee Committee. His passion for collecting artists’ books is somewhat ironic, considering the inherent exclusivity involved in collecting scarce objects: what excites Aarons’ about books and multiples is their ability to touch the hands of not only wealthy collectors like himself, but also of those who can’t afford to participate in the fine art market—the artist’s friends and peers, young makers, and fans. Artists' books are democratic, tactile, and accessible.

You can read the full article HERE.